Advent, Day 3: Donate to the food bank

Margaret made a paper chain countdown to Christmas at Sunday School and the links (pre-printed in an Oriental Trading kit) have cute little activities each day. Stuff like “make a point to smile at 10 people today” and “give someone a compliment.”

At least that’s what they lure you in with. When we pulled off today’s activity – after school because we’d forgotten in the morning – it was “donate canned goods to a local shelter or food bank.”

I’m all for food banks and giving and all that, but it was already 4:00 and I needed to pick up Paul and Eleanor from my parents’ house, have dinner, and get the kids to church for AWANA. I had some extra canned goods, but when was I supposed to fit in a trip to the food bank? Are you kidding me, paper chain?

As I tried to decide whether a little piece of paper could make me do something, I also considered that since Wednesdays are so crazy I’d planned small, quick family Advent activities for those nights. Stuff like ‘drink hot chocolate before bed.’ Making a donation and talking about hunger seemed a little more Christmas spirit-y. And I wouldn’t have to make hot chocolate.

So I think and think and google food bank locations, which was a bust since you have to donate downtown and we didn’t have time. Finally I remembered the hunger bags at the grocery store and decided we could go buy one (which you leave there for the store to take to the food bank).  There was a store right on the way home and we were in and out in 10 minutes.

Day 3

We were not without attitude in the process.

You probably can’t read the list in the picture, but each hunger bag includes a jar of peanut butter, a 1 lb bag of rice/pasta (does this mean one or the other? both?), 2 cans green beans, and 2 cans tuna.

We talked (for a really long time…they got kind of into it) about how all different kinds of people don’t have enough food. They might be homeless and have almost nothing, yes, but they also might look just like us. They could have a house and toys and clothes, but still not have enough food right now. I’m not entirely sure they got it – they were really into the NO house! NO clothes! NO food! scenario, and I worried they didn’t understand you can’t always SEE hunger – but at least we brought it up.

You win, paper chain.